Wu Hung Seminar One: From Monuments to Ruins

Moderator: Guo Weiqi, Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts 

Time: December 27th, 2015 (Sunday) 10AM- 5PM

Venue: Gallery, OCAT Institute. Jinchanxilu, Chaoyang District, Beijing (100 meters North from Subway Line 7, Happy Valley Scenic Area Station, Exit B)

Organizer: OCAT Institute 

Supported by: OCT Beijng

 

Preface

“Monument”, a common term in Western art history, is normally used to describe majestic historical sites of an often commemorative nature. It could also refer to canonical texts that resonate across the past and the present, or even serve as a synonym for “masterpiece” to designate the great works of art throughout history. About twenty years ago, Wu Hung from University of Chicago employed the term “monumentality” to highlight certain characters of zhongqi (or, heavy vessels) in Chinese ancient art and architecture; he thereby teased out a fascinating thread in Chinese art history that initiates from the Prehistoric era and extends to the Wei Jin Southern and Northern dynasties. In 2009, a translation of the book Monumentality in Early Chinese Art and Architecture was made available to Chinese readers, thus opening up more focused discussions on the concepts of monument and monumentality among Chinese art historians.


 “Ruins” is another important term in Western artistic and cultural tradition, whose concept is inextricable from that of “monument”. Indeed, as many scholars have pointed out, all monuments would eventually become ruins. Coinciding with this historical and temporal logic, Professor Wu Hung saw in the notion of ruins another underlying theme in the later periods of Chinese art history. If the original publication and translation of Monumentality in Early Chinese Art and Architecture were separated by a significant gap in time, then the Chinese and English versions of A Story of Ruins: Presence and Absence in Chinese Art and Visual Culture made their readers’ debuts at roughly the same time. As introduced by the author, “[t]he larger purpose of this book is to think of Chinese art and visual culture globally” (p. 7). Similarly, this more recent publication soon brought the concept of “ruins" to the fore of art historical research in China. 

 

The research interests of the four invited scholars at the seminar intersect with both monument and ruins in various ways. Professor Zheng Yan is one of the translators of Monumentality in Early Chinese Art and Architecture, the theme of which is intimately linked with his own research on the stone arches at Anshang and the Epang Palace among others. Professor Wu Xueshan has just completed his manuscript on The Great Wall as a typical manifestation of the symbiotic relation between monument and ruins in a single historical site. Professor Tang Keyang, the author of From Ruinous Garden to Yan Garden, works at the intersection between history of architecture and history of art. Professor Wan Muchun has a long-standing interest in the pre-modern period of Western art and is currently conducting research for his manuscript on the history of travel and peregrination in China. With their respective case studies at hand, our four speakers willdebate and discuss the use significance of these two concepts for Chinese art history, and offer a compelling joint narrative on the transformation from monuments to ruins.

 

Introduction of the Seminar Schedule

 

December 27, 10-12 AM

Speaker: Zheng Yan, Professor, Central Academy of Fine Arts

Topic: What Is a “Tiejiasha [Iron Monastic Robe]”? 

 

The Lingyan monastery in Changqing, Shandong province, has long housed a piece of cast iron that measures 2.05 meters tall. Part of the “Twelve [or Eight] Scenes of Lingyan”, it was originally called “tiejiasha” and was said to have belonged to Bodhidharma or the original founder of the monastery. This paper offers an interpretation of this object from two different perspectives: the first is an archaeological one, while the second falls in the domain of cultural history. The former argues that the tiejiasha is a fragment left from a guardian figure that once formed part of a group of iron sculptures with Vaiśravaṇa as its centrepiece; the group was commissioned by the Emperor Gaozong of Tang and the Empress Consort Wu Zetian. The latter provides a philological background to the object’s name and traces the transformation of its meaning through history, contending that the designation of “tiejiasha”was a result of the “remaking of holy objects” by the monk in the monastery, while its ‘potency’ gradually diminished in time. These discussions pay special attention to the “work” as a fragment and its multiple roles in these two intersecting histories.

 

Speaker: Wu Xueshan, Associate Professor, Minzu University of China

Topic: Frontier as Ruin: National Allegory in Landscape

The Great Wall entered nineteenth-century Western photography as a kind of “picturesque”ruins. It was at once a symbol of Eastern civilization and a testimony to China’s decline. Since then, Western vision of “ruins” has been projected onto China’s Great Wall. During the Sino-Japanese War that happened at the Great Wall between the end of 1932 and the beginning of 1933, the damage caused by the Japanese army was heavily reported. Images of the Great Wall in newspapers and magazines recast the monument as “a ruin of war”, and performed forceful visual critique of the outrageous atrocities by the enemy.

 

A critical change took shape in 1937, when the Sino-Japanese War was in full swing and a new imagination of the ruin-image was on the rise. These images were constantly transmitted and echoed in photographs and paintings, and ultimately became part of the war-time visual culture: a soldier stands still on a broken and ruinous wall, as a protector of the country’s territory who calls the citizens to arm against their foreign enemies. During the Japanese evasion of Guangxi, the northern iconography of the Great Wall was soon taken up as a model for the visualisation of the Zhennan Guan on the southern border. 

 

The frontier as ruins has two layers of meanings. On the one hand, the Western view of “ruins” was internalized after its introduction to China, and the ruin became part of Chinese visual culture. On the other hand, the frontier as ruins gradually took on an allegorical guise. That is, the ruins were transformed into an allegory of the nation that would ultimately rise against its dereliction towards a glorious rebirth.  

 

December 27th, 2-4 PM

Speaker: Tang Keyang, Associate Professor, Renmin University of China

Topic: The Last 10 Minutes of Monument

The idea of “history” has ancient roots, but the formation of an idea of “history” in the field of architecture is a recent phenomenon. It does not encompass every past historical event, nor does it exist in a simple “past tense” or “past perfect tense”. We could associate this particular form of history with the presentism implicit in our understanding of memory—memory is not the passive expression of a will to reconstruct the past, but rather designates a constantly renewed understanding of the present through life. During the past century, various cases of ‘historical preservation’ manifested a desire and effort to reclaim the past for the present. 

 

“The latest ten minutes” refers to a certain kind of “new classics” within the building history of mankind; it also confronts a conception of time within the ars memoriae of modern civilisation yet to be closely examined. Is it the “Classics” and the Ancients against the Moderns? Or an indefinite“past” as opposed to the now, or “a perfected perfect tense”, or even a past infused with the now which holds within it both the old and the new? Similar distinctions and expressions can be found in theories and practices of historical preservation. Contemporary culture sees the relentlessly continuous process of heritage and monument-making. Amidst the frenzy tides of renewal, everything is ephemeral all the while calling for ever more preservation.

 

Such contemporary monuments, intertwining the present tense with the perfect tense, have become a significant chapter of architectural theory. “The latest ten minutes” that this paper will discuss is as much a historical episode as it is meta-history, a magical ars memoriae. Echoing the unique “construction” and “spatial” character of architecture, this metahistory both lays bare the general mechanism of history-making and dictates the actual process of sense-making.  

 

Speaker: Wan Muchun, Associate Professor, China Academy of Art

Topic: Travel in Western China: From 17th to 19th Century

 

December 27th, 4-5 P.M. Roundtable Discussion

Participants: Wu Hung, Zheng Yan, Wu Xueshan, Tang Keyang, Wan Muchun, Guo Weiqi etc.

 

Speakers 

Zheng Yan

Zheng Yan graduated with an archaeology major from the Department of History, Shandong University, and holds a PhD in History from the Department of Archaeology, Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. From 1988 to 2003, he worked at Shandong Museum as researcher and Deputy Director. He then took up his current teaching position as Professor and Deputy Dean of School of Humanities at the Central Academy of Fine Arts. He was also visiting scholar at Department of Art History, University of Chicago, senior research fellow at The Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA) at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and visiting scholar at Department of History Art and Architecture, Harvard University. His main area of research is art history and archaeology of Han and Tang.

 

Wu Xueshan

Wu received his BA from Department of Art History, Central Academy of Fine Arts, and his Ph.D from School of Humanities, Central Academy of Fine Arts in 2015. Since 2003, Wu has been teaching at School of Arts, Minzu University of China. Between 2011 and 2012, Wu was visiting scholar at Harvard Yenching Institute. His main area of research is Chinese art history, and has recently dedicated his research to the history of Chinese modern art and the visualisation of nation states.

 

Tang Keyang

Tang Keyang holds a Doctor of Design from Harvard Graduate School of Design and MAs in art history and comparative literature, from University of Chicago and Peking University respectively. He was the curator of the Chinese Pavilion at the 12th Venice Architectural Biennale and has been academic director and jury member of the new building project of National Art Museum of China since its opening in 2010. He is Associate Professor at the School of Arts at Renmin University of China, the recipient of the ‘Sanqin Scholar’ award from Shannxi Province, and has served as judge or jury member for several art and architectural projects.

 

His major exhibition projects as a curator and exhibition designer include Glories of Chinese Writing at the Palace Museum, Beijing (2010), As a curator and exhibition designer, he mainly presented the following exhibitions, the Chinese garden exhibition during the Europalia Chinese Art Festival, Brussels (2009), the Asian art exhibition at Bo’ao Forum for Asia (2009), and Chinese Gardens for Living at Schloss Pillnitz (on behalf of National Art Museum of China, in collaboration with Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden)(2008). Besides design of gallery space and exhibition display for art galleries and museums, Tang also advocates an open model for art museums and urges for innovative experiments with diverse art spaces for a pluralistic culture and society.

 

The author of From Ruinous Garden to Yan Garden and the translator of Delirious New York, Tang also published monographs and articles on architecture and urbanism with Joint Publishing, the Commercial Press, Peking University Press, and Cornell University Press. His articles could be found in journals from China and beyond, such as Dushu, Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, The Architect, Architectural Journal and etc. He has also published many creative writings, including Night, Tree (in Chinese and French), and Fireworks in Chang’an.

 

Wan Muchun

Born in 1972, Wan is Associate Professor, Doctoral Advisor and Deputy Dean of Advanced School of Art and Humanities at the China Academy of Art. He attended Chaohu Normal Vocational School, Anhui, Nanjing University of the Arts and China Academy of Art. He held teaching positions at Jiangxi Normal University and China Academy of Art. Wan Muchun was an art lover at an early age; he took up various jobs before teaching at academic institutions. He launched his professional research career in art history with his M.A. thesis Studies on Early Medici Family Art Collection: the Value of Painting in 15th Century Florence (published). Eager to carry out research with first-hand material, his interest later turned to calligraphy and painting connoisseurship in Ming. Under the supervision of Professor Fan Jingzhong, he finished his Ph.D. dissertation ‘The Idle Dweller of Weishui Xuan: The World of Calligraphy and Painting in Jiaxing at the End of Wanli Period’(a monograph under the same title has been published). His work also includes translations, including Aby Warburg’s ‘Sandro Botticelli's Birth of Venus and Spring: An Examination of the Concepts of Antiquity in the Italian Early Renaissance’, and Karl Popper’s The Logic of Scientific Discovery (co-translation). Wan Muchun takes the methodological stance as a historian throughout his research on art history and other humanities disciplines. He regards all academic writings as “creative endeavors”, and believes that the individual experience and feeling are inseparable from a scholar’s academic research. Currently, he is interested in travels in western China between the 17th and 19th centuries, on which he has published an article “Away from the Mountains and Waters: A Profile of Pre-modern Chinese Concept of Landscape”, as a first attempt at a long-term study.

 

Moderator

Guo Weiqi

Guo Weiqi is Associate Professor and Head of the Art History Department at Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts. Guo graduated from Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts with a master degree in 2005 and continued to teach there. He graduated from Nanjing Normal University in 2010 with a Ph.D., and was a visiting scholar at Center for the Art of East Asia at the University of Chicago from September 2013 to September 2014. Since 2005, he has taught courses on the historiography of Chinese art history and painting theories in pre-modern China, and have published several related articles. His main publications include a monograph Norm and Form : A Conjecture on Wen Zhengming and The Style of Wu School in the Sixteenth Century, and Chinese translation for Boundaries of the Self: Chinese Portraits, 1600-1900. He is in the process of writing Cartography and Landscape in Coromandal Screen, and He Xiangning and the Imagery of Fierce Animals in the Early 20th Century, and is working on the translation The Shape of Time: Remarks on the History of Things.




姓名

立即订阅